Notary Instructions | Probate Court of Jefferson County, Alabama

Here is the answer to the question, and where you can start researching.

Requirements and Application Process Applications are available in the Probate Court Office Records Department or online http://jeffcoprobatecourt.com You must be 18 years of age or older to apply. You must be a resident of Jefferson County to apply. Proof of residence will be verified through the Board of Registrars or with two forms of proof of residence such as Driver’s License, utility bill, rent receipt. Applicants need to complete the application listing all information as it appears on the Voter Registration or Driver’s License. You must have three separate references from Jefferson County residents who will attest to your integrity and suitability. References must sign in their own handwriting and include their home address.  NOTE:  A renewal does not require the three references, its renewal takes place within 30 days before or after expiration. You must obtain a $25,000.00 Surety Bond. You can get it at almost any insurance company.  Be sure to have your signature notarized on the Bond in the Oath of Office section within the Bond. You must submit your Bond and application within 30 days of the “Seal Date” on the Bond, or have the Seal Date updated by your Bonding Company (Insurance Co.).If your Bond/Application is returned to you for corrections, you must resubmit it after corrections are made in order for your Commission to be processed. Once you have completed your application and have your Bond properly notarized, either mail or bring the application, Bond, and a $42.00 filing fee check made payable to the “Judge of Probate”.You will receive a Certificate of Commission effective on the date you return the required documents. The commission is good for four years from that date. To view or print the APPLICATION for Appointment as a Notary Public, click here.

Source: Notary Instructions | Probate Court of Jefferson County, Alabama

IT’S-A NUMBERS GAME…

In addition to covering your home, homeowners insurance also covers four more things:

  1. Your outbuildings, landscaping, and hardscaping. If you have outbuildings (like a barn), landscaping, or hardscaping (like fences), your homeowner’s policy most likely covers those for up to 10% of your policy amount (5% for plants).

For example, if you have $100,000 in homeowners insurance and someone drives into your fence, the policy would cover 10% or $10,000 in repairs.

Sometimes policies exclude damage to outbuildings, landscaping, or hardscaping caused by a particular peril (like wind).

  1. Damage or loss of your personal belongings. Your homeowner’s policy covers your family’s belongings, even when you take them out of the house. If your child heads to college with a laptop and it’s stolen, that’s probably covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy.

A home insurance policy covers a lot of your personal belongings, but not necessarily everything.

You’ll need additional insurance if you have many expensive items like jewelry, furs, or antiques.
Policies will either state that your personal belongings are insured for replacement cost or cash value.

Replacement cost means that the insurance company will pay the full cost of replacing an item (such as the laptop mentioned above, or a sofa damaged in a fire) once you show a receipt. Cash value means the insurance company will issue you a check for the amount that the laptop or sofa would have been worth when it was stolen or destroyed.

III. Remember your Additional Living Expenses will have limits. You are still on a budget. If you exceed that budget you may have to come out of pocket. Your policy will have limits on how long you stay and how much you can spend.

  1. Injuries or accidents at your house. Homeowner’s insurance coverage includes liability – meaning it covers you when you or your family members cause injuries or damage. This coverage also pays when your dog bites someone (medical payments) or someone falls and injures themselves.

We’re getting closer to storm season. 2017 was devastating. Check with your agent and make sure you are prepared.

Remember; “It’s A Numbers Game”!!!

Michael Gould

IT’S A NUMBERS GAME!!!

In addition to covering your home, homeowners insurance also covers four more things:

I. Your outbuildings, landscaping, and hardscaping. If you have outbuildings i.e. shed, fence, or landscaping, your homeowner’s policy most likely covers those for up to 10% of your policy amount (5% for plants trees, and debris removal).

Example, if you have $100,000 in homeowners insurance and someone drives into your fence, the policy would cover 10% or $10,000 in repairs.

Sometimes policies exclude damage to outbuildings, landscaping, or hardscaping caused by a particular peril (like wind).

II. Damage or loss of your personal belongings.Your homeowner’s policy covers your family’s belongings, even when you take them out of the house. If your child heads to college with a laptop and it’s stolen, that’s probably covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy.

A home insurance policy covers a lot of your personal belongings, but not necessarily everything.

You’ll need additional insurance if you have many expensive items like jewelry, furs, or antiques.
Policies will either state that your personal belongings are insured for replacement cost or cash value.

Replacement cost means that the insurance company will pay the full cost of replacing an item (such as the laptop mentioned above, or a sofa damaged in a fire) once you show a receipt. Cash value means the insurance company will issue you a check for the amount that the laptop or sofa would have been worth when it was stolen or destroyed.

III. Remember your Additional Living Expenses will have limits. You are still on a budget. If you exceed that budget you may have to come out of pocket. Your policy will have limits on how long you stay and how much you can spend.

IV. Injuries or accidents at your house.Homeowner’s insurance coverage includes liability – meaning it covers you when you or your family members cause injuries or damage. This coverage also pays when your dog bites someone (medical payments) or someone falls and injures themselves.

 We’re getting closer to storm season. 2017 was devastating. Check with your agent and make sure you are prepared.

Remember; “It’s A Numbers Game”!!!

Michael Gould

IT’S THE LAW !

The sale and purchase of a home are one of the most significant events that any person will experience in his or her lifetime. It is more than the simple purchase of housing, for it includes the hopes, dreams, aspirations, and economic destiny of those involved.

The Law

Civil Rights Act of 1866: The Civil Rights Act of 1866 prohibits all racial discrimination in the sale or rental of property.

Fair Housing Act: The Fair Housing Act declares a national policy of fair housing throughout the United States. The law makes illegal any discrimination in the sale, lease or rental of housing, or making housing otherwise unavailable, because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

Americans with Disabilities Act: Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in places of public accommodations and commercial facilities.

Equal Credit Opportunity Act: The Equal Credit Opportunity Act makes discrimination unlawful with respect to any aspect of a credit application on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age or because all or part of the applicant’s income derives from any public assistance program.

State and Local Laws: State and local laws often provide broader coverage and prohibit discrimination based on additional classes not covered by federal law.

Responsibilities

The home seller, the home seeker, and the real estate professional all have rights and responsibilities under the law.

For the Home Seller: As a home seller or landlord you have a responsibility and a requirement under the law not to discriminate in the sale, rental and financing of property on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. You cannot instruct the licensed broker or salesperson acting as your agent to convey for you any limitations in the sale or rental because the real estate professional is also bound by law not to discriminate. Under the law, a home seller or landlord cannot establish discriminatory terms or conditions in the purchase or rental; deny that housing is available, or advertise that the property is available only to persons of a certain race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

Michael Gould

(205)902-2283

E21 Realty

4000 Southlake Parkway #200

Hoover, Al.35244

michaelgould@e21realty.com

 Twitter-@lmgllc6

“Don’t go into court without a lawyer or a real estate deal without a REALTOR”

IT’S A NUMBERS GAME !!!

What is debt? What is credit?  Let’s keep it simple. credit is how much you can borrow.

Debt is the payback ratio.  basically there are two kinds of debt; managed and unmanaged.

Managed debt is good for building credit; it is the consistency of paying over time that lenders look for. Word of caution keep your debt paid down to a third of your total limit…ie. your total limit is $300 your limit is $100. I Hear you. but  remember this is  the formula by which you are  judged, and your creditworthiness is increasing, and that is a good thing. Find your total debt limit  on your card and divide by 3…Walla!  This should be your personal limit. Life happens… and when it does we may have to cut some other things i.e. movies, eating out…you get the point.

What if  I’ve been turned down for credit?  Go to a financial institution and inquire about a secure credit card or line of credit. You give them the money, and so they have no risk. Pay  on time keeping the third rule enforced and after 3-6mos you can ask for an increased line of credit.

 Disclaimer: please consult your financial adviser on how to construct your debt.This is not to be considered as financial advice.

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IT’S A NUMBERS GAME !!!

A real estate student knows the dangers of lead base paint, and pipes. so are we to believe the state of Michigan was unaware of the contamination, and whose next.
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has required a Lead base Paint Addendum (LBPA) on pre-1978 homes. Here is HUD’s latest remedy. What do you think?

HUD Number16-034 FOR RELEASE
Shantae Goodloe Friday
202-708-0685 March 18, 2016
http://www.hud.gov/news/index.cfm

HUD OFFERS OVER $100 MILLION IN GRANTS TO CLEAN UP LEAD
AND OTHER HOUSING-RELATED HEALTH HAZARDS
Funding to protect children from housing-related lead poisoning, asthma & allergies

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development today announced that it is making more than $100 million in grants available to help eliminate dangerous lead-based paint hazards from the homes of lower income families. These grants are intended to protect young children from lead poisoning and provide an opportunity for states and local communities to establish programs to control health and safety hazards by assessing and re-mediating lead-based paint and other housing related health hazards.

HUD Secretary Julián Castro is focused on advancing policies that create opportunities for all Americans, including helping children and families secure quality housing by protecting them from the hazards of lead-based paint and other home health and safety hazards.

IT’S A NUMBERS GAME !!!

vol. 16  edition 03

Crowdfunding Title III of the Jobs Act went into effect as of January 29th of 2016.

What does this mean to you?  Now you can raise capital up to $1 Million and allows unaccredited investors to participate in crowdfunding. It is the opinion of many who watch this closely, that this is real crowdfunding because it opens investments to a significant population of investors through an unaccredited investors definition, which caps investors income or net worth at $ 100,000. Title III also articulates what regulatory compliance will exist for crowdfunding platforms and the companies that conduct a capital raise through a platform.

Remember, funding portals will be required to register with FINRA and the SEC and will be subject to ongoing reporting

Let’s start some businesses…

http://www.e21realty.com

Commercial and Residential

IT’S A NUMBERS GAME!!!

It seems as though two can play the game better than one, or at least out of the gates.

Nar’s recent survey indicated that 27% of first time home buyers were married with kids,

36 years of age, and a combine income of 100k.

Next unsuspected and trailing by 9 years …the single male making his first purchase at 45

Years of age income streaming around 67k, however it is noted that 39% of this 89% group

were previous owners. (Silently) Go Men!!!

5 links (years) behind the single males are the single females. Fabulous 50 years of age and touting

$57,300 income 39% were first timers, however we shall note that of this group 87% had owned before.

Coming in last place are the kids, yet to buy a home or pay a mortgage, or any other bills. (pssst) kids it’s

A trick. Don’t ever grow up.

Oh yea, did I mention that 9o-95% of all these groups (smart people) used a REALTOR…

Michael Gould

Commercial & Residential Consultant

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